NUMATIC PUMPS

Magnetic Drive Pump

Magnetic Drive Pump

We are one of a leading Magnetic Drive Pumps manufacturers in Mumbai India. We have a compleate range of Magnetic Drive Pumps in compare to material and size. Our range of Magnetic Drive Pumps include PP Magnetic Drive Pumps, PVDF Magnetic Drive Pumps, SS Magnetic Drive Pumps. Thinking of Magnetic Drive Pumps we have all sizes from 15 LPM uptp 650 LPM.

What is a Magnetic Drive Pump?

A magnetic drive pump is a centrifugal pump in disguise. The monoblock type magnetic drive pump, also known as a close-coupled pump, has a single connection that is directly joined to the motor shaft. The other kind is a coupled pump, which has two couplings: one inside the pump, which is magnetic, and the other outside the pump, which links the pump and motor. The magnetic drive pump is a close-coupled pump that delivers power from a driver to a driven machine using magnets rather than a regular coupling. For a long-coupled pump or a frame-mounted pump, a regular connection is used in addition to the magnets.

Mag Drive pumps are sealless pumps that move fluid through the pump by using the technology of a drive magnet and an inner magnet connected to an impeller. A rear casing or housing separates the drive magnet and inner magnet, resulting in a sealless containment. A Mag Drive Pump will prevent fluid leakage and, more importantly, save you from losing potentially dangerous and costly liquids. With environmental concerns and EPA requirements more stringent than ever, sealless pumps allow for zero fugitive emissions, allowing them to meet the necessary compliances. Due to their simplicity, mag drive pumps save maintenance time replacing seals and dealing with hazardous leaks. There is little chance of failure with only two moving parts.

How does a magnetic drive pump work?

A magnetic drive pump is a pump that is driven by magnets rather than electricity from an outside source. Magnetic drive pumps are energy efficient and operate without the use of mechanical shaft seals. Magnetic drive pumps circulate fluids such as chemicals, acids, water, and lubricants. Because a magnetic drive pump has no mechanical shaft seal, the possibility of harmful chemical spills or the pump overheating due to obstruction is removed.

 

A revolving impeller installed in an enclosed housing propelled by a rotating magnetic field created by individual magnets is one of the general features of a magnetic drive pump. The rotation of the impeller generates a force that propels liquid through and around the pump’s housing. The pump’s primary function is to maintain energy and motion in a fluid. This prevents water or other liquids in a pond or tank from becoming stagnant.

 

Magnets are attached to the impeller and motor of a magnetic drive pump. The pump’s driving assembly is fitted with permanent magnets. The drive magnet, which drives the inside rotor, is coupled to a second shaft that is powered by the motor. When the motor is turned on, its magnet rotates. The magnetic force generated by the motor’s magnet forces the magnet on the impeller to spin and rotate.

Type of Sealless Pumps, Magnetic drive pump or Canned motor pump?

Magnetic drive pump

A magnetic pump has several advantages that stem from its simple design. The biggest advantage of a magnetic drive pump is that it has less maintenance, A magnetic drive pump can operate normally for more than ten years without needing to be repaired. There are no costs for seal replacement or maintenance, as well as the risk of costly downtime if there are no seals. O-rings and bearings, on the other hand, can be checked regularly (even every year or two) to ensure there is no wear. The other advantage of a magnetic drive pump is its reduced risk of leaks and fines, Hazardous fluids can be pumped without fear of leakage or vapour emissions. This allows the plant to avoid costly EPA fines while also protecting employees from the risk of exposure to toxic chemicals or explosive fluids. Because the simplified coupling magnetic drive pump or motor does not need to be aligned, the coupling is very simple. Magnetic drive pumps are reliable and dependable and perform as expected.

Canned motor pump

The rotor winding of a canned motor pump is encapsulated in a ‘can,’ and it, as well as the entire drive shaft up to the impeller, is immersed in the pumped fluid. Canned motor pumps are typically smaller in size, have fewer bearings, and are more efficient. Secondary containment is also included as standard: if the ‘can’ is ruptured, the pumped medium is contained within the stator housing. This can be especially useful if the pumped medium is so dangerous or expensive that secondary containment is required. Secondary containment is available on some magnetic pump designs, but it is usually an extra cost.The main disadvantage of canned motor pumps is that if the motor fails, the entire unit must be replaced. Because the motor is not an integral part of the pump, a magnetic drive pump can be repaired or upgraded. Slurries, liquids at high and low temperatures, and volatile fluids can all be handled by canned and magnetic drive pump designs.Often, the choice of pump is solely determined by site standards or preferences.

Magnetic Drive Pump assemby

Magnetic Drive Pump Exploded View

Magnetic Drive Pump Exploded View

Magnetic drive pumps advantages and disadvantages.

Pumps are typically divided into two types: conventional-sealed pumps and seal-less pumps. The first category includes pumps that require a sealed system, typically in the form of a mechanical seal. The second category contains all types and models of seal-less pumps, which do not require a seal. Magnetic-driven pumps are a popular type of seal-less pump. They are used in services where leaks are unacceptable or liquids are difficult to seal. Magnetic drive pumps, also known as magnetically coupled pumps, differ from traditional pumping styles in that the electric motor (the driver) is magnetically coupled to the pump rather than via a direct mechanical shaft. The pump is powered by a drive magnet, which eliminates the need for shaft sealing. This is a significant benefit. Magnetic drive pumps, on the other hand, cannot be used in some applications and have power rating limitations. This article discusses magnetic drive pumps in processing facilities, as well as their characteristics, benefits, and drawbacks.

 

 

Advantages of using magnetic drive pumps

Magnetic drive pumps have some limitations because they use magnets to transfer torque and power from the drive assembly to the impeller assembly. Magnet materials, for example, can lose their magnetism when exposed to temperatures above their melting point. As a result, the temperature characteristics of each service are critical. The magnetic coupling causes some energy to be lost. This is due primarily to magnetic resistance. Because of this and other factors, a typical magnetic drive pump is typically less efficient than conventional centrifugal pumps. There are some power rating limitations because a very large or powerful magnetic coupling is neither feasible nor cost-effective. When choosing these pumps, power and torque limitations should always be taken into account. One of the major drawbacks of magnetic drive pumps is the risk of running dry. Because the pumped liquid acts as a lubricant and coolant, in the event of a dry run, the bearing and some other parts may overheat and become damaged. Magnetic drive pumps should not be used in services or applications where there is a risk of dry running.


Magnets must be properly sized so that the magnetic-coupling breakaway torque is not exceeded during startup or in any other potential transient operational cases. If the breakaway torque is exceeded, the magnetic coupling between the drive and driven assemblies is lost, and the impeller stops spinning, requiring the pump to be tripped to allow the magnets to recouple. Magnetic Drive Pumps are also extremely sensitive to transient conditions such as low flows and operation close to the shutoff head. Magnetic drive pumps are commonly used in applications where leakage of the pumped liquid poses a significant risk, such as with aggressive or risky liquids, exotic materials, acids, alkalis, corrosives, pollutants, and toxins. They are also used for ultra-pure liquids and liquids that are difficult to seal. Sealed pumps used for these services may leak over time or require complex, expensive double seals to prevent hazardous/challenging liquids from escaping into the atmosphere, posing safety risks, downtime, and increased maintenance requirements.

Another important application for magnetic drive pumps is for difficult liquids; for example, certain liquids can crystallise on seal faces, causing seal failures. A permanent flush system should be run to the seal to avoid this. However, this can raise the cost of maintenance, seal flushing liquids, and energy consumption. A magnetic drive pump is a better solution for these difficult services.


Because there is no direct connection between the electric motor shaft and the impeller in magnetic drive pumps, no seal is required. Unless the pump casing is broken, there is no risk of leakage. Seals are a common cause of pump trips and unplanned shutdowns. The removal of seals significantly improves pump performance, reliability, and availability. The risk of leakage is eliminated, allowing liquids to be pumped without spillage. By removing the seals, you eliminate the associated friction loss, wear, costs, and noise. This allows for complete separation of liquid from the pump drive and improved motor power transfer to the pump. Because the pump chamber is completely separated from the electric motor by a large air gap, there is virtually no heat transfer from the electric motor; this acts as an effective barrier between the two. Any shocks or spike torques will be softened by the magnetic coupling. Even in extreme circumstances, it will serve as a fuse. Magnetic couplings can be temporarily broken if the pump’s load is too great. In practise, this means that the pump is not overloaded and damaged. Most metallurgies and materials, metallic and nonmetallic, are available for magnetic drive pumps. Pumps with polymer linings are also used because they are more corrosion resistant. Polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE), perfluoroalkoxy alkanes (PFA), and polyvinylidene fluoride are polymer coating options (PVDF). These lined or non-metallic options are typically used for normal temperatures, typically below 90°C. For even higher temperatures, metallic magnetic drive pumps have been used.


Magnetic drive pump bearings

Because a magnetic drive pump is an enclosed piece of equipment, bearings cannot be lubricated with oil or grease. As a result, the pumped liquid is used for bearing lubrication as well as cooling. A portion of the pumped liquid is usually taken from the pump discharge; this flow is often referred to as recirculation flow and is used for cooling the magnetic system, lubrication of radial and thrust bearings, and other similar applications where lubricant or cooling fluid is required. Magnet drive pumps are typically outfitted with “sleeve bearings,” which lubricate themselves using the pumped liquid. A sleeve bearing is the most basic type of bearing, with only bearing surfaces and no rolling elements. As a result, the sleeve or journal slides over the bearing surface, which is lubricated by the pumped liquid. In addition to being compact and lightweight, these bearings have a high load carrying capacity and a longer life than many rolling-element bearings. The materials used in their construction, as well as the required clearances between the sliding surfaces, may limit the liquids and services for which this type of pump can be used.

Traditionally, magnetic drive pump bearings have been made of silicon carbide, which has proven to be an excellent bearing material under normal operating conditions; however, it can suffer under certain abnormal conditions such as dry running, dynamic loading, and potential impact. Some modern materials, such as advanced ceramics, have been used with great success in these. Another material under consideration is a fiber-reinforced silicon carbide ceramic composite with bearing properties similar to silicon carbide but with high impact resistance and excellent dry running tolerance. These modern options provide numerous advantages, including improved impact resistance, excellent wear resistance, and overall longer life and performance.
Modern sleeve bearings for magnetic drive pump applications should have smooth surfaces, either from a dedicated surface treatment on sleeve surfaces or from a coating, to reduce the coefficient of friction sufficiently, allowing for longer periods of safe operation under dry run conditions. A variety of malfunctions and maloperations can cause dry running. The most common mode of failure for magnetic drive pumps is heat generation from dry running conditions. Modern bearing materials are typically up to two times harder than traditional silicon carbide, ensuring that they will not fail in even the harshest operational environment. Modern magnetic drive pump sleeve bearings should have smooth surfaces, either from a dedicated surface treatment on sleeve surfaces or from a coating, to reduce the coefficient of friction sufficiently, allowing for longer periods of safe operation under dry run conditions. Dry running can be caused by a variety of malfunctions and errors. Heat generation from dry running conditions is the most common mode of failure for magnetic drive pumps. Modern bearing materials are typically up to two times harder than traditional silicon carbide, ensuring that they will not fail in even the most demanding operational conditions.

The pumped liquid must maintain a proper film thickness (at least a few microns) at operating temperature and load to act as a lubricant, or the sleeve bearings will suffer severe wear. Many liquids, including hot water and most solvents, lack this property and thus cannot function as lubricants. On the other hand, if sufficient pressure or flow rate is not provided for the liquid passing through the bearings and other critical areas, the area will overheat, which can be a serious problem. The result can be flashing of the liquid and a potential loss of lubricating ability as the liquid heats up and loses viscosity.

Disadvantages to using magnetic drive pumps

Magnetic drive pumps have some limitations because they use magnets to transfer torque and power from the drive assembly to the impeller assembly. Magnet materials, for example, can lose their magnetism when exposed to temperatures above their melting point. As a result, the temperature characteristics of each service are critical. The magnetic coupling causes some energy to be lost. This is due primarily to magnetic resistance. Because of this and other factors, a typical magnetic drive pump is typically less efficient than conventional centrifugal pumps.

 

There are some power rating limitations because a very large or powerful magnetic coupling is neither feasible nor cost-effective. When choosing these pumps, power and torque limitations should always be taken into account. One of the major drawbacks of magnetic drive pumps is the risk of running dry. Because the pumped liquid acts as a lubricant and coolant, in the event of a dry run, the bearing and some other parts may overheat and become damaged. Magnetic drive pumps should not be used in services or applications where there is a risk of dry running.

 

Magnets must be properly sized so that the magnetic-coupling breakaway torque is not exceeded during startup or in any other potential transient operational cases. If the breakaway torque is exceeded, the magnetic coupling between the drive and driven assemblies is lost, and the impeller stops spinning, requiring the pump to be tripped to allow the magnets to recouple. Magnetic Drive Pumps are also extremely sensitive to transient conditions such as low flows and operation close to the shutoff head.

 

Magnetic Drive Pumps for liquids containing solids.

Magnetic drive pumps can only handle a small amount of solids. If the pumped liquid is dirty, solids will accumulate in the passages surrounding the magnet and in the close tolerances of bearings, such as between the sleeves. This will interfere with the pump’s performance and cause issues, including failures. Furthermore, solids will wear out bearings and other components. 

 

Liquids containing ferrous particles pose a problem in a magnetic drive pump because the particles collect on the magnet and cause the pump to weaken and eventually stop working. In theory, sleeve bearings may be able to grind up some particles of lower hardness; this has resulted in some claims for magnetic drive pumps’ solids handling capabilities. Some manufacturers’ “wild” claims have been extraordinary, exaggerated, and even false. This solids handling capability is dependent on details such as solid size as well as bearing materials and characteristics — the presence of some solids can be less problematic with hard and strong bearing materials than with weaker materials used in some low-cost bearings.

 

The upper percentage and size limits of solids in the pumped liquid may be noted as 1.5 percent and up to 70 microns, respectively. The latter could be up to 100 microns for some special pumps. There was a case of very strong and robust magnetic drive pumps that handled 2% or 2.5 % of solids to 150 microns successfully. Bearing clearances usually dictate the particle size limit. Higher particle sizes can be screened out of the way of liquid to bearings using a screen, strainer, or filter. Pumps for 5% solids (or sometimes more) up to 200 microns (or even more) can be operated if a clean flush is provided to the magnetic drive or a closed-loop system is installed; such a system is a special one available only from a few manufacturers.

 

Indeed, the figures presented above are very simplified and approximate limits. Comprehensive analyses and studies should take the characteristics and nature of solids into account for a reliable and optimal selection of pumps for each service. Sticky or fibrous solids, for example, can clog bearings or flow channels. Highly abrasive solids will eventually wear parts, so for maximum pump life, strong wear-resistant materials should be used in these services. For proper pump selection, all potential operating ranges should be considered. Recirculation will accelerate wear at low flow rates, and high solids rates will accelerate wear at higher flow rates.

Magnetic Drive Self Priming Pump

PP Magnetic Drive Pumps suitable media:

• Acetic Acid

 Acetone

 Aluminum Hydroxide

 Alum

 Ammonia 10%

 Barium Carbonate

 Benzyl

 Boric Acid

 Brine
 Bromotoluene
 Calcium Bisulfite
 Calcium Chloride
 Calcium Hydroxide
• Chromic Acid 30%
 Citric Acid

 Copper Sulfate

 Detergents
 Diethanol Amine
 Dipropylene Glycol
 Magnesium Sulfate
 Ethanol

 Ethylene Diamine

 Ferric Chloride

 Ferric Sulfate

 Gelatine
• Glucose
• Heptanal

 Hydrochloric Acid

 Hydroflouric Acid

 Hydrogen Peroxide

 Hydrogen Sulfide

• Isobutanol

 Lactic Acid

 Lead Acetate
• Lead Nitrate
• Lead Sulfamate
• Lime Sulfur
• Magnesium Chloride
• Magnesium Hydroxide
• Magnesium Nitrate
• Methyl
• Mercuric Cyanide
• Mercuric Nitrate
• Mercury

 Methyl Amine

 Methyl Methacrylate

 Monovinyl Acetylene

 Natural Gas

 Nickel Chloride
• Nickel Nitrate
• Nickel Sulfate
• Potassium Sulfate
• Perchloric Acid
• Phenol
• Phosphoric Acid
• Sodium Hypochlorite
• Silicone
• Sodium Nitrate
• Sodium Borate
• Sodium Perborate
• Sodium Sulfate
• Tannic Acid
• Varnish
• Vinegar
• Zinc Chloride
• Zinc Sulfate

PVDF Magnetic Drive Pumps suitable media:

• Acetate Solvents

• Acetic Acid 30%

• Acetyl Acetone

• Acetyl Chloride

• Acetylene

• Allyl Alcohol

• Aluminum Chloride 

• Ammonium Dichromate

• Ammonium Sulfide 

• Amyl – Alcohol

• Amyl – Chloride

• Aniline Hydrochloride 

• Benzyl Alcohol

• Benzol 

• Butadien

• Butane 

• Bromine

• Calcium Sulfide

• Calcium Nitrate

• Carbon Bisulfide 

• Carbon Monoxide

• Carbon Tetrachloride 

• Chloracetic Acid 

• Chloroform 

• Chrome Plating Solutions 

• Cyclohexane 

• Diisolbutylene 

• Ethyl Chloride 

• Ethylene Chloride 

• Ethylene Trichloride 

• Flouroboric Acid

• Freon

• Gasoline (Petrol) 

• Hydrogen Sulfide

• Heptane

• Hexane 

• Hydrobromic Acid 

• Idoform 

• Lithium Bromide

• Methane

• Methyl Bromide 

• Methyl Dichloride

• Mineral Oil

• Naptha 

• Napthalene 

• N-Octane 

• Nitrogen

• Ozone

• Palmetic Acid

• Phosphoric Acid (50-100%)

• Potassium Cupro Cyanide 

• Salt Water

• Silicone Greases 

• Tetraethyl Lead 

• Titanium Tetrachloride

• Toluene

• Urea (Carbamide)

About us

Who we are

Numatic Pumps has been manufacturing chemical pumps for acids and dangerous liquids since 2014, when its founders, Yaseer Charolia and Mavia Charolia, established their own company after extensive experience in pump design and manufacturing.

The company is distinguished by the high quality of its pumps, which is ensured by the use of high-quality and virgin materials, as well as the constant care of qualified and always up-to-date personnel, who pay special attention to the customer’s needs and offer assistance throughout the entire purchasing process.

The list of our main products are

* Magnetic Drive Pumps

* PP Pumps

* PVDF Pumps

* PTFE Pumps

* SS Pumps

* AODD Pumps

* Electric Barrel Pumps

* Pneumatic Barrel Pumps

* Self Priming Pumps

In addition to maintenance and repairs for Industrial Pumps, the company provides excellent service. This includes the supply and installation of mechanical spare parts for the pump.

Our Mission

“The Numatic Pumps team is dedicated to earning its customers’ trust by providing cost-effective pumping solutions.” We add value to processes, resulting in higher profitability for our customers.”

Our Vision

  • To inspire and provide opportunities to people for personal growth.
  • Build a network of customers and suppliers to create mutual, long-term partnership value.
  • Bring a portfolio of high-quality products and services to the market.
  • Maximize long-term returns to stakeholders while keeping our overall responsibilities in mind.
  • Be a highly efficient, lean, secure, and fast-paced organisation.

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